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Real Self vs Ideal Self

Looking into the look 


Carl Rogers is the psychologist that invented the terms real self and ideal self and the differences between them. To get a deeper understanding of what exactly social media and filtering does to pictures, specifically Kylie’s pictures, here are some definitions: 

“It is healthy to some extent to have what we envision as an ideal self.  It is something that we all strive for; to be the best that we can be.  Who doesn’t want that?  The problem arises when our ideal selves are too far removed from what we really are.  When there is a huge discrepancy between what we are, and what we think we should be, we begin to experience a dissonance, a lack of resonance within our true selves, and a gap, sometimes huge, between what we sense as our real self compared to what we feel compelled to aspire to (our ideal self).  When the discrepancy is huge, the resulting incongruence can lead us to become demoralized and discouraged because we have in fact set ourselves up for failure. This discrepancy can lead to stress and anxiety because the real self never seems good enough and the  ideal self seems impossible to attain.”

I found this to be particularly interesting because almost ALL of Kylie’s pictures on her social media pages are not the original picture or anything close to it. It seems like she’s aspiring to be a girl without freckles, long lashes, and big lips but in reality she isn’t. Roger’s considers that she may have anxiety and other self esteem issues because of it, which is probably true.

However, although she may have some psychological issues that tend to come from fame, she’s the only one that’s been able to turn her insecurities into a brand and market her ways of changing her look.